Eclectic Muddlehood

How's this for a perplexing beginning? I am a great many things, but none of them are me. At least not in my entirety. This is the little corner where I attempt to make the whole greater than the sum of its parts as I muddle through being a wife, a mother and a woman... among other things.

Name:
Location: Virginia, United States

Here, in no particular order, is a short list of my parts from the mundane to the pretentious, some or all of which may surface in future attempts to work on the whole: wife, mother, doula, childbirth educator, writer, yoga student, homeschooler, amature organic gardner, kitchen witch, all-around foodie, spiritual truth-seeker, daughter, clutter-bug, complusive list maker, bibliophile, homemaker, friend, homebirth/natural birth advocate, impulse shopper, wine snob, knitter, artist, lover, sensuist, and email junkie (There may be more later, but that's it for now.)

Friday, February 24, 2006

My First Gray (Technically White) Hair

I discovered my first gray hair tonight. Technically the hair is white. And when I say white, I mean brilliant snow white! I have been expecting them to show up at some point and time in my life, as I have watched my mother's hair develop a considerable amount of silver over the years mixed among her dark brunette locks. What I wasn't expecting was to discover my first one the same place my father seems to be sporting most of his these days, in my eyebrow. Yet there it sits. Perched saucily over my left eye, bending against the general wave of the majority of its cohorts, it says hello with a deep graceful bow. I am almost proud of it. And I just can't bring myself to pluck it quite yet.

Wednesday, February 01, 2006

BOOK REVIEW: Woman: An Intimate Geography

From time to time I plan on sharing a book recommendation as I find new gems or delve back into some old favorites. This is my newest recreational reading and it is really fantastic. Woman: An Intimate Geography by Natalie Angier is a fantastic odyssey into what makes female humans women. My progressive nature believes that this really should be mandatory reading for 12 to 14 year old girls. Although, they might need to read it with a dictionary close by because the vocabulary is intense. But, the reason I plan on plopping this book down in my own daughter's lap (with any luck before she becomes sexually active) is that it is the epitome of a healthy, independent, feminist sexuality. Ms. Angier uses biology, anthropology, psychology, spirituality, and just plan eloquent humor to revel in and reveal the glorious mysteries and sacred abilities of us fabulous women. She addresses head on topics that are not accepted in our culture as polite conversation- the anatomy of the clitoris, the beauty and power of our eggs, the mysteries of breastmilk, and those hormones some people conveniently blame for every bad day a woman might experience. This book dares us to be proud of our bodies and their capabilities and to view ourselves as women as unique and powerful, not malformed males or copies of the original. Pick it up after the sun goes down, to enjoy under the silvery moon- preferably naked with maybe a sensuous bubble bath and something chocolately as your only other companions. Then when you finish it, drop it into your daughter's hands and watch her blossom magnificently without the confusion, shame, frustration and uncertainty that we experienced as adolescent women weighing her down.